Friday, 16 May 2014

People are capable of anything....

....except doing nothing, the only thing worth doing.

34 comments:

  1. An excellent and civilisation-shattering apophthegm which should be displayed on posters up and down the land and the lands.

    ReplyDelete
  2. David Rickerby16 May 2014 at 06:08

    I like doing nothing. It's cheap, can be done at anytime, can be done alone or with others. It requires no special equipment or clothing. Because its non-productive, it can't be commercialised or regulated, thus, you can do it anywhere you are. For most people though, it will require some practice, conviced they are that 'The Devil Makes Work for Idle Hands.' Thankfully, help is available, for those who consider the 'Work Ethic' to be a disease worse than Cancer. Just ask the commentators on this blog:)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Karl ,
    Good to see you are writing again.Since your last post a lot of bad things happened to me-primarily because I could not stop myself from being a "doer".
    Okay,wanna ask you something-
    1)How do I fight boredom if I do nothing?
    2)Should I never ever initiate a conversation with anyone? If someone starts talking to me should I just give monosyllabic answers?
    3)Should I keep away from the opposite sex members as much as possible as relationship with them invariably turns bad?

    Can you think of an easy ,painless way to shuffle off this coil?
    Thanks.Keep well ,brother.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David Rickerby16 May 2014 at 11:48

      I'm going to take a shot at answering this.

      1) Don't 'fight' boredom. Let it come let it all come, erotic reverie, the poem you want to write, memories good and bad. Let it come and, then you can let it go.

      2) I am a regular at a cafe where I drink coffee, and sit in the corner writing on the computer. Most of the time I speak to no-one, except greetings to people I know, but, its a cafe and people become interested in what I'm doing, and they ask me. I always reply and talk with them. I neither seek or reject contact, because I don't measure my value as a person by my popularity

      3) Depends on the person, and, what you're seeking. Why do your relationships end badly? Stop doing that.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Rickerby.

      Delete
    3. Regarding question 3: If you are like Zoidberg, they avoid you…

      Delete
  4. One of my favourite non-doers was Roger 'Syd' Barret, admittedly he was a non doer for not quite the best of reasons-as a musician he found he had synesthesia and saw colours whilst playing his music, and when other people took drugs to see colours to his music he rather foolishly took drugs with them the colours would not switch off. even there was silence. Nonetheless I liked his painting technique, paint something photograph it, then paint over it and just keep all the photographs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not a fan, but a musician (and painter) who goes through the moil and toil of recording, releasing, and touring for several acclaimed albums - in the 60s, no less - is far from being a non-doer. He may have stopped working later on, but Barrett in his 20s is actually a good example of someone with a strong will and inclination to do.

      Delete
  5. <3

    You truly outdid yourself, Karl. Worth the long wait! =)

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's just a pity that doing nothing is so hard to do.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pithy and beautifully put!

    A few of the commenters here have expressed an affinity for H.P. Lovecraft -
    http://www.dagonbytes.com/thelibrary/lovecraft/index.html

    ReplyDelete
  8. To be free from having to do anything, that's freedom!
    It's intrinsically good and no one has it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Karl, I cannot fully agree.

    If we do have a purpose, it's to prevent and mitigate against individual suffering - at least so long as humanity remains a going concern. If that's what suffering prevention is about, shouldn't we do at least something to not make this world even worse than it already is?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Filrabat, suffering *prevention* may be best served by doing nothing: do not procreate, do not be ambitious, do not be an egomaniac.

      Suffering *alleviation* is probably best served by small scale actions: be nice to the cat, help your neighbour. Any large scale actions are generally doomed.

      Delete
    2. 1) You donate your organs when you die. Ten people survive and procreate, that genetic line will last for thousands of years.

      2) You die without any good deeds, you simply do nothing. Thousands of people are spared.

      Delete
    3. Right on. You guys know what´s up.

      Delete
    4. http://www.surgicalneurologyint.com/article.asp?issn=2152-7806;year=2013;volume=4;issue=2;spage=335;epage=342;aulast=Canavero

      I don't know what to do with this...

      Delete
    5. No, it won't last for thousands of years. Humanity won't survive that long because of nano and bio technology. DerivedEnergy wanted to write a book about this. Alas, he's dead. RIP.

      Delete
  10. Karl,

    Your post is what I meant by prevention and alleviation. If we can prevent a bad event from happening to someone already alive, we should do it. Likewise for mitigation. I was thinking in terms of having some sort of meaning in this life for people who already exist.

    You are right about preventing the birth of someone who would have that need.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Preventing suffering is honourable, but I don't think it provides meaning. At best, it's a firefighting operation that can never be won.

      Delete
    2. Meaning is something that man needs but isn't out there for him to seize it. Things not human do not crave meaning nor know meaninglessness; only man hopes to do something that goes beyond gratification or relief. Meaninglessness is us, humans, who exist and instinctively think about it. Just like the best purpose is to reduce the evil of suffering, the only pursuit of meaning is to contribute towards the elimination of mankind's meaninglessness.

      Delete
    3. Meaning is some vague bullshit people think will help with their problems, but won't really. No one intelligent gives a shit about meaning.

      Delete
  11. We are the meat in an infinity sandwich. Why this?...

    http://news.yahoo.com/pregnant-pakistani-woman-stoned-death-family-163143284.html

    ReplyDelete
  12. Good news, life on earth will likely collapse into extinction in around 15 years due to methane leaks gushing out of the Arctic. It's looks like the runaway greenhouse effect has indeed been engaged.

    This guy ( no pun intended ) says it better than I can. He starts at around the 15:00 minute mark.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbpXTHayZO8

    I guess this means I can finally drop this tiresome facade of enthusiastic life loving, sooner rather than later.

    Take care folks.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Here is an abbreviated version for those interested.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXj6W4gysow

    ReplyDelete
  14. The forbidden zone ... once you've mastered the art of doing nothing ... access to leisure will no longer be a cause for depression. Could it be because so many among the multitudes can't handle leisure without extreme discomfort anxiety that for centuries there has been a vast campaign (among the people as well as those who manipulate them) to lionize "productive workers," soldiers, police, judges, doctors, etc ...

    I know I am preaching to the choir, but even when one is not able to "do nothing" and engages in "work" - if that business is not done in a setting where one is "earning money," then one might as well be doing nothing as far as the ass-licking ladder-climbing corporate drones are concerned.

    Working on a novel? Fuck no! I'm scribbling nonsense in my diary, gortard.

    PS: Karl, if you don't see me posting much, it is because I have returned to mostly scribbling in notebooks again. I find I am better able to express politically incorrect sentiments without a potential audience. [READ: thought police]

    PEACE!

    ReplyDelete
  15. The forbidden zone ... once you've mastered the art of doing nothing ... access to leisure will no longer be a cause for depression. Could it be because so many among the multitudes can't handle leisure without extreme discomfort anxiety that for centuries there has been a vast campaign (among the people as well as those who manipulate them) to lionize "productive workers," soldiers, police, judges, doctors, etc ...

    I know I am preaching to the choir, but even when one is not able to "do nothing" and engages in "work" - if that business is not done in a setting where one is "earning money," then one might as well be doing nothing as far as the ass-licking ladder-climbing corporate drones are concerned.

    Working on a novel? Fuck no! I'm scribbling nonsense in my diary, gortard.

    PS: Karl, if you don't see me posting much, it is because I have returned to mostly scribbling in notebooks again. I find I am better able to express politically incorrect sentiments without a potential audience. [READ: thought police]

    PEACE!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I don't know about 'doing nothing', as far as I know even the dead decompose, their flesh is still doing something when their mind has stopped. Though decomposition must be absolute at some point. For the living, though, when it comes to a sense of doing less then not wearing a wrist watch (invented a mere 110 years ago for air pilots who needed two hands to fly) is a possible solution. Not living by tight schedules, and letting what you do take it's own time will make what we do do seem less important, and might reduce self importance.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Another interesting article:
    http://www.iflscience.com/brain/people-would-rather-experience-electric-shock-be-alone-their-thoughts

    I guess the "head transplant" article I tried to post earlier on was too irrelevant to publish?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought I had published it, Martin, but if not you can send it again and I'll put it up.

      Delete
  18. Walking Contradiction23 September 2014 at 20:31

    Your post reminded me this great and well-known quote by Cioran: “A zoologist who observed gorillas in their native habitat was amazed by the uniformity of their life and their vast idleness. Hours and hours without doing anything. Was boredom unknown to them? This is indeed a question raised by a human, a busy ape. Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end. For it ends, only to be replaced by fear, the cause of all activity. Inaction is divine; yet it is against inaction that man has rebelled. Man alone, in nature, is incapable of enduring monotony, man alone wants something to happen at all costs—something, anything.... Thereby he shows himself unworthy of his ancestor: the need for novelty is the characteristic of an alienated gorilla.”

    ReplyDelete
  19. Karl, great little bit here. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) I had acquired a distaste, an anxiety disorder if you will, around others since as far back as I can remember. I currently (at 37) do not work and have never held a job more than a month. It seemed whenever I had to go to work it was an absolutely horrid feeling of dread and disdain for what I was supporting. I get by now with a meager amount of money. While it is true that I can be mostly satisfied with being idle or getting by with very frugal distractions, there is that nagging itch knocking at the door every so often that makes one feel alienated from others. I suppose instead of the struggle to survive physically, the discomfort is in the alienation and utter absurdity-monotony that seems to be everyday "get through the day" distractions. Don't get me wrong, I think it would be worse working for the man but I have to wonder what to do with myself much of the time. I think Charles Bukowski said it best " Somedays I put on my shoes and then say to myself, now what?"

    ReplyDelete