Wednesday, 29 November 2017

The Futility of Antinatalism

"Antinatalism is an epic failure. Such a philosophy is unthinkable and unobtainable for the vast majority. An infinite chasm exists between it and the average person’s weaknesses, depravities, priorities, etc... I honestly believe most CANNOT live up to such things no matter what. They can’t even come close to doing so....AN is and always will be a total failure. It is no less a version of philosophical opium for the sensitive than religion. That's why I laugh when I see people here and elsewhere demand more "AN activism", as if there were an ice-cube's chance in hell of it ever taking off." - Joint statement from two AN Elders

"The lessons never seem to get learnt. They never seem to get learnt. Maybe the odd individual will learn them, but you still see this madness around you. You can say, ‘For goodness’ sake! Can’t you see how you’re making the same mistakes humans have made before? Can’t we do this differently?’ But it doesn’t happen. Unpleasantness and suffering are too deeply written into the structure of sentient life to be eliminated.”- David Benatar

New Yorker interview with David Benatar

Monday, 23 October 2017

New Benatar essay and vitriolic response

A new and succinct Benatar essay with some interesting comments:

Having children is not life-affirming, it's immoral

And an unusually moronic and vitriolic response even by normal standards:

Evil Professor calls for end to humanity

Stay sterile!

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

From AN to Alternative-Right?

A friend writes to me:

"I've noticed that in the Venn diagram of subcultures, AN and Alt-Right have overlapped for awhile, but it seems like more and more pessimistic/AN people are moving in that direction."

Do you agree? If so, why might this be the case? Are some people suddenly dreading the thought of being part of a declining culture that may find itself outnumbered by more traditional cultures who still place a heavy emphasis on propagation and expansion?

All thoughts welcome. (Well, some anyway).

*****************************************************************

In other news, one of my favourite bloggers is active again: Louie over on 'Everything is Pointless'. He also has a new podcast show up and running. For some reason, I've having trouble embedding the addresses on the blog-list, but he can be found at

http://everythingispointless.com/

And 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvBjdxGibLxh5_LLq6y35CQ

I encourage everyone to take a look!

Monday, 5 September 2016

Testimony of a bereaved parent

This deeply moving and tragic testimony was submitted as a comment last week. It merits its own post.

"As someone who had a child (who died at the age of 21 months in a car accident, never comprehending what was happening to him), I'd like to say a few things.

The first is this: it was the single greatest joy I ever experienced. And he was overjoyed to be alive. You could see it in his face and how he ran about. I never loved anyone or anything more. I don't think I could have. I was more alive and joyous and ecstatic than I had ever been. I delighted in his growth and his intelligence, strength and courage. It was likely the best time of my life. And I'm grateful for it.

Then he died. Run over by his mom in a driveway. Totally not her fault. She thought he was playing with me somewhere else and could not see him (she was backing up). I had forgotten what my wife was doing and never thought he was in danger where he was. Neither of us was drunk, or high, or anything else like that. Kids played on that road all the time. We were just doing what we always did together. Then he died.

That was the worst pain I ever experienced. I won't go into it. It was beyond awful, more painful than when I almost lost a thumb to a wood splitter. I thought I would die for most of it. I just could not believe that my beautiful son was gone, just like that. I had brought him into the world only to die at 21 months old. I was (in other's eyes, not just my own) a great father, as these things go, and heaven knows his mom was lovely. I loved him dearly, more than I had words for. I would have literally died to protect him, and that is no joke. But that choice was not given to me. I had no control at all, in the end, other than the obvious things like loving him, educating him, and not hitting or abusing him or wrecking his sense of self and belonging. Life had cars, and diseases, and other life-threatening things I could not stop. But somehow I had forgotten that, as my wife and I had had fairly happy childhoods and had survived. Not so for him.

As time has gone by, I have thought about whether I had any right to bring a person into this world, even when circumstances are (and they were) good, or at least as good as they could have possibly been. Given what I have learned about our condition in the universe, and the extreme evidence brought about by my son's early death, at this point I would have to say 'no'. I don't. Even though I think he would have had a really good life had he lived to see it, and he did have about the best of all possible worlds when he was alive, I don't know that for a fact. I just wish I had thought about this before he lived, and died, as much as I loved him and as much as I wish he was still here long enough to say 'sorry' to and wish him on his way (even though I know in my head he cannot hear me and is now just bones). I'll live with what happened forever. And as beautiful as he was and as great as it was to have him in our lives, I hope and pray (ha!) that I'll never do that again. It's not fair. The next one could die too, or worse.

Thanks for listening. This seemed an appropriate place to tell this story."

Wednesday, 13 January 2016

The Futility of the Sensitive

Sensitivity, kindness, compassion and all these other alleged virtues are of little use in this world. In fact, they will make your life harder than it need be, as you will be crippled by over-awareness of every slight, every injustice, every pointless grief. Life is a violent process, generated by violence (think of the thrusting, grunting, force and possession involved in the sexual act), and maintained by violence. Your life will be happier the more of a pig you can be. Moreover, those you help, or imagine helping, will not be that grateful; most will go on to procreate and renew the slaughterhouse, and applaud the others who do so.

Another good reason to be a pessimist.

Monday, 16 November 2015

We will always be ruled by Thugs

By definition, those who enter politics are almost invariably extroverted, confident and determined. They have a vision of the world and they are dedicated to foisting it on you. You will be part of their narrative, regardless of whether you want to be or not. They seek power and adulation. They have a 'positive' vision. They are all pro-family and pro-life.

Pessimists, antinatalists and generally those in any way sensitive are generally introverted, solitary and disgusted by the world. Like the wise snail, they seek to curl up in their sanctuary and be left undisturbed. Sensitive people do not wish to expose themselves to the mob. They do not wish to 'compete', to prostitute themselves, to endure the demeaning gaze of the public eye. Bar their impotent fantasies of world annihilation or world sterilisation they do not seek power.

Thus it is almost an iron law that Assholes will always rule. Another good reason to be a pessimist.

Saturday, 7 November 2015

iPhonitis

Ok, this is a rant of no particular philosophical import, bar that it touches on the vacuity of life and the triviality of human beings.



iPhones. They are everywhere. You cannot walk down the street without beholding some biped fleshsack shuffling along, with their snouts buried in a small screen, eagerly engrossed in the electronic phantasgamoria. Most importantly, these people are not looking where they are going, so in essence you have the added responsibility of not only watching your own step but you also have to be aware that this clod may and often will walk right into you, so engrossed are they in their Facebook updates and 'likes'.

Then you get on public transport. Again, every clown there has their face riveted on the small screen that gives them an illusion of a life.
 
Worse for me personally I've noticed that every time I sit down in a library someone will inevitably sit down next to me and will start playing with their phone immediately, so even in a fucking library there's no escape. A few days ago some woman had her phone on vibrate and the damned thing was rattling the table violently every five seconds. I gave the bitch such a glare that she put it on silent, but even the fact that I had to resort to such tactics pissed me off.

And then there are the background factors. iPhones need a mineral named coltan to function. This is where it comes from:

The Slavery that drives your iPhone

I sent this link to a friend of mine who fancies himself as a diehard Leftist and 'Revolutionary', or in other words he's deluded. He responded with an email worthy of any squealing teenage girl: "But I just cannot function without an iPhone". You see, ultimately Capitalism and innovation is the greatest revolutionary force of all: it moulds people to its ends without their even realising it.

I'm glad I don't have one; in fact, only two other people I know don't and I hope we continue to hold out.

And it's also fair to say that the indispensability of the wretched gadget for most people again just underlines the ultimate vacuity of life and the terror of reality. Imagine if people had to do without their toys and contemplate the sky, their lives, their mortality...